Our Programs

Our Programs

CASA

Court Appointed Special Advocates

What is a CASA?

When a child is in the juvenile court system due to abuse or neglect, a CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) volunteer represents the best interest of the child in court hearings and many other areas of the child’s life. The purpose of CASA is to be the child’s voice in court, making sure children are safe, have a permanent home and have the opportunity to thrive.  Without a CASA, children may find themselves trapped in the court and child welfare system, spending their entire childhood moving from one temporary placement to another.

How does the CASA model work?

CASA volunteers are appointed by judges to advocate for children’s best interests. They stay with each case until it is closed and the child is in a safe, permanent home. Volunteers work with legal and child welfare professionals, educators and service providers to ensure that judges have all the information they need. Volunteers help judges develop a fuller picture of each child’s life. Their advocacy enables judges to make the most well-informed decision for each child.

What does a CASA volunteer do?

As a CASA volunteer, you will form a one-on-one relationship with a child to get a full picture of the case. A CASA volunteer’s work with children is one-on-one, but they do not work alone. Each volunteer is trained and supported by highly qualified CAPS staff member.

How can I become a CASA volunteer?

To change a child’s life for the better, click the volunteer link below. You’ll be trained and supported every step of the way.

For more information:

Volunteer
Contact Us
Burke

This is Burke, CAPS very special four legged CASA volunteer. His main job responsibility is to provide trained support to children. Burke may accompany a child to court during court hearings and testimony or accompany a child and his/her CASA during a routine visit. For more information email Burke@capselkhart.org

Help CAPS Meet the Growing Need by Becoming a CASA Volunteer Today!

The Problem: overwhelmed systems

  • Child welfare systems are in a state of crisis, partly due to a devastating opioid epidemic.

  • More than 440,000 children are in foster care on any given day.

  • The average child in foster care spends more than a year in care.

The Solution: advocates from the community

  • Volunteer advocates are screened, trained and supported by CASA program staff.

  • CASA volunteers form a one-on-one relationship with a child and get a full picture of the case.

  • Judges depend on CASA volunteers for critical information to help them make the most well-informed decisions.

CASA

Court Appointed Special Advocates

What is a CASA?

When a child is in the juvenile court system due to abuse or neglect, a CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) volunteer represents the best interest of the child in court hearings and many other areas of the child’s life. The purpose of CASA is to be the child’s voice in court, making sure children are safe, have a permanent home and have the opportunity to thrive.  Without a CASA, children may find themselves trapped in the court and child welfare system, spending their entire childhood moving from one temporary placement to another.

How does the CASA model work?

CASA volunteers are appointed by judges to advocate for children’s best interests. They stay with each case until it is closed and the child is in a safe, permanent home. Volunteers work with legal and child welfare professionals, educators and service providers to ensure that judges have all the information they need. Volunteers help judges develop a fuller picture of each child’s life. Their advocacy enables judges to make the most well-informed decision for each child.

What does a CASA volunteer do?

As a CASA volunteer, you will form a one-on-one relationship with a child to get a full picture of the case. A CASA volunteer’s work with children is one-on-one, but they do not work alone. Each volunteer is trained and supported by highly qualified CAPS staff member.

How can I become a CASA volunteer?

To change a child’s life for the better, click the volunteer link below. You’ll be trained and supported every step of the way.

For More Information:

Volunteer
Contact Us
Burke

This is Burke, CAPS very special four legged CASA volunteer. His main job responsibility is to provide trained support to children. Burke may accompany a child to court during court hearings and testimony or accompany a child and his/her CASA during a routine visit. For more information email Burke@capselkhart.org

Help CAPS Meet the Growing Need by Becoming a CASA Volunteer Today!

The Problem: overwhelmed systems

  • Child welfare systems are in a state of crisis, partly due to a devastating opioid epidemic.

  • More than 440,000 children are in foster care on any given day.

  • The average child in foster care spends more than a year in care.

The Solution: advocates from the community

  • Volunteer advocates are screened, trained and supported by CASA program staff.

  • CASA volunteers form a one-on-one relationship with a child and get a full picture of the case.

  • Judges depend on CASA volunteers for critical information to help them make the most well-informed decisions.

CFAC

Child and Family Advocacy Center

What is CFAC?

The Child and Family Advocacy Center (CFAC) provides services for the Elkhart County multidisciplinary team (MDT) that investigates child victim crimes, by interviewing children that may have been victims of sexual or physical abuse. The MDT is made up of Department of Child Services (DCS), Law Enforcement and the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office.

To understand what a CFAC is, you must understand what children face without one. Without CFAC, the child may end up having to tell the worst story of his or her life over and over again, to doctors, police officers, lawyers, therapists, investigators, judges, and others. They may have to talk about that traumatic experience in a police station where they think they might be in trouble, or may be asked the wrong questions by a well-meaning teacher or other adult that could hurt the case against the abuser. When police or DCS believe a child may be experiencing abuse, the child is brought to CFAC by a caregiver or other “safe” adult. At CFAC, the child tells their story once to a trained interviewer who knows the right questions to ask in a way that does not retraumatize the child.

What is a forensic interview?

A forensic interview is a fact-finding, objective interview designed to reduce the possible trauma to the child while enabling them to talk about their abuse experience. The agencies involved in the case watch the interview through a live feed, while a specially trained forensic interviewer talks one-on-one with the child. This allows the agencies involved in the case to hear, and have input, into the interview without the child having to have contact with multiple professionals or having to talk about what happened multiple times. Every aspect of the interview process, including the toy filled waiting room, highly trained staff, and the child friendly environment, is in place to make the experience comfortable for the child and to allow him or her talk about their situation.

The Child and Family Advocacy Center is accredited by the National Children’s Alliance

For more information:

Contact Us
family
CFAC

Who does the advocacy center collaborate with?

  • Elkhart County Sheriff’s Department

  • Elkhart City Police Department

  • Goshen Police Department

  • Nappanee Police Department

  • Bristol Police Department

  • Wakarusa Police Department

  • Middlebury Police Department

  • Millersburg Police Department

  • Indiana State Police

  • Department of Child Services

  • Oaklawn Victims Assistance Services

  • Bristol Street Pediatrics

  • Prosecutor’s office

  • Lincoln Therapeutic Partnerships

Tips for Parents Bringing Their Child to CFAC

Should I talk to my child about what happened?

No. If your child brings up the subject and wants to talk about it, listen without questioning. Be sure to reassure your child that you will be taking care of them. If your child does tell you additional information, please contact DCS or Law Enforcement.

How do I explain to my child what is going to happen?

It is helpful to inform your child that someone wishes to talk with him or her about what was reported. However, it is equally important not to rehearse with your child or tell your child what to say. You should let your child know that they will be in a safe place and the adults they are visiting will let them know exactly what is happening each step of the way. Avoid describing CFAC as a doctor’s office, as this often confuses children or they fear they will have to get a shot.

May I watch the interview?

No. Due to the sensitive nature of these investigations, it is necessary to provide a neutral setting for the child. This allows them to feel comfortable to speak freely without the influence of other individuals in the room.

How long will my visit last?

All visits are different depending on the situation of the child. Depending on the attention span, talkative nature of the child, severity and history of alleged abuse, etc., interview times vary greatly. Please allow time for a brief meeting with our family advocate to gather information, the forensic interview with the child and a post-interview meeting.

Where do I go when I get to CAPS?

You do not need to enter through the main door of CAPS. You can access CFAC by using the door on the right side of the building (opposite the elk and flagpole). Ring the buzzer next to the door to gain access into CFAC.

What happens after the interview?

After the interview is completed, a DCS and/or Law Enforcement representative will speak with you about what steps will be taken next.

Who can I ask about the interview?

DCS and Law Enforcement are the only agencies able to answer questions regarding your child’s interview. The information they provide may be limited due to the fact that this may be an ongoing investigation. They will tell you everything necessary to keep your child safe.

What if my child needs a medical exam?

The CFAC staff will work collaboratively with DCS and Law Enforcement representatives to ensure a medical exam is scheduled if necessary. If a medical exam is needed, arrangements will be made to have your child seen at the hospital. The hospital staff are trained to provide exams in a manner which is sensitive to past trauma and that allows the child to be in control of the exam. Medical exams are free of charge and are not billed to the family’s insurance.

How do I access additional services?

You will likely meet with a CFAC family advocate during your child’s interview and you will have a chance to ask and talk about potential services needed. The CFAC family advocate can assist with questions you may have and ensure you are aware of other community resources that may be helpful to you and your family.

What if my child needs mental health counseling?

The DCS representative can assist you in getting linked with counseling services. Upon request, the CFAC family advocate will provide additional follow up to families regarding mental health referrals and accessing appropriate support services.

How much is a visit to CFAC?

There is no cost to families or children for any services at CFAC.

CFAC

Child and Family Advocacy Center

What is CFAC?

The Child and Family Advocacy Center (CFAC) provides services for the Elkhart County multidisciplinary team (MDT) that investigates child victim crimes, by interviewing children that may have been victims of sexual or physical abuse. The MDT is made up of Department of Child Services (DCS), Law Enforcement and the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office.

To understand what a CFAC is, you must understand what children face without one. Without CFAC, the child may end up having to tell the worst story of his or her life over and over again, to doctors, police officers, lawyers, therapists, investigators, judges, and others. They may have to talk about that traumatic experience in a police station where they think they might be in trouble, or may be asked the wrong questions by a well-meaning teacher or other adult that could hurt the case against the abuser. When police or DCS believe a child may be experiencing abuse, the child is brought to CFAC by a caregiver or other “safe” adult. At CFAC, the child tells their story once to a trained interviewer who knows the right questions to ask in a way that does not retraumatize the child.

What is a forensic interview?

A forensic interview is a fact-finding, objective interview designed to reduce the possible trauma to the child while enabling them to talk about their abuse experience. The agencies involved in the case watch the interview through a live feed, while a specially trained forensic interviewer talks one-on-one with the child. This allows the agencies involved in the case to hear, and have input, into the interview without the child having to have contact with multiple professionals or having to talk about what happened multiple times. Every aspect of the interview process, including the toy filled waiting room, highly trained staff, and the child friendly environment, is in place to make the experience comfortable for the child and to allow him or her talk about their situation.

The Child and Family Advocacy Center is accredited by the National Children’s Alliance

For more information:

Contact Us
family
CFAC

Tips for Parents Bringing Their Child to CFAC

Should I talk to my child about what happened?

No. If your child brings up the subject and wants to talk about it, listen without questioning. Be sure to reassure your child that you will be taking care of them. If your child does tell you additional information, please contact DCS or Law Enforcement.

How do I explain to my child what is going to happen?

It is helpful to inform your child that someone wishes to talk with him or her about what was reported. However, it is equally important not to rehearse with your child or tell your child what to say. You should let your child know that they will be in a safe place and the adults they are visiting will let them know exactly what is happening each step of the way. Avoid describing CFAC as a doctor’s office, as this often confuses children or they fear they will have to get a shot.

May I watch the interview?

No. Due to the sensitive nature of these investigations, it is necessary to provide a neutral setting for the child. This allows them to feel comfortable to speak freely without the influence of other individuals in the room.

How long will my visit last?

All visits are different depending on the situation of the child. Depending on the attention span, talkative nature of the child, severity and history of alleged abuse, etc., interview times vary greatly. Please allow time for a brief meeting with our family advocate to gather information, the forensic interview with the child and a post-interview meeting.

Where do I go when I get to CAPS?

You do not need to enter through the main door of CAPS. You can access CFAC by using the door on the right side of the building (opposite the elk and flagpole). Ring the buzzer next to the door to gain access into CFAC.

What happens after the interview?

After the interview is completed, a DCS and/or Law Enforcement representative will speak with you about what steps will be taken next.

Who can I ask about the interview?

DCS and Law Enforcement are the only agencies able to answer questions regarding your child’s interview. The information they provide may be limited due to the fact that this may be an ongoing investigation. They will tell you everything necessary to keep your child safe.

What if my child needs a medical exam?

The CFAC staff will work collaboratively with DCS and Law Enforcement representatives to ensure a medical exam is scheduled if necessary. If a medical exam is needed, arrangements will be made to have your child seen at the hospital. The hospital staff are trained to provide exams in a manner which is sensitive to past trauma and that allows the child to be in control of the exam. Medical exams are free of charge and are not billed to the family’s insurance.

How do I access additional services?

You will likely meet with a CFAC family advocate during your child’s interview and you will have a chance to ask and talk about potential services needed. The CFAC family advocate can assist with questions you may have and ensure you are aware of other community resources that may be helpful to you and your family.

What if my child needs mental health counseling?

The DCS representative can assist you in getting linked with counseling services. Upon request, the CFAC family advocate will provide additional follow up to families regarding mental health referrals and accessing appropriate support services.

How much is a visit to CFAC?

There is no cost to families or children for any services at CFAC.

Community

Education

Parenting in the 21st Century is hard!

To best manage the influx of new technologies, new norms, and new information, parents need to be kept up-to-date. And parenting education is the vehicle to accomplish this, because the more you know, the more options you have.

All parents need help every now and then!

All parents need a broad scope of knowledge, skills, and support that no one person or parent possesses. CAPS provides parenting support and education to families so they can do the best job they can in raising their children. By gaining important insights and learning new skills parents can help their children reach their potential. The CAPS Community Education program provides parenting support as well as education to the community on how to keep children safe.

Payment

For more information:

Contact Us

Community Education utilizes three evidence-based / evidence-informed curriculums:

Triple P: Positive Parenting Program (Parent Support) Triple P is a parenting program, but it does not tell you how to be a parent. It is a toolbox of ideas. Parents choose the strategies they need and the way they want to use them. Classes include Group Triple P, Group Triple P in Spanish, Teen Group Triple P and Family Transitions.

Darkness to Light (Community Empowerment) Darkness to Light is an evidence-informed program which is focused on creating a world free of child abuse and neglect where adults have the courage to protect kids.

Monique Burr (Community Empowerment) The Monique Burr program educates and protects children and teens from all types of bullying, abuse, and victimization with evidence-based and evidence-informed prevention education programs. The program offers developmentally appropriate modules for all children in grades K-12.

Community

Education

Parenting in the 21st Century is hard!

To best manage the influx of new technologies, new norms, and new information, parents need to be kept up-to-date. And parenting education is the vehicle to accomplish this, because the more you know, the more options you have.

All parents need help every now and then!

All parents need a broad scope of knowledge, skills, and support that no one person or parent possesses. CAPS provides parenting support and education to families so they can do the best job they can in raising their children. By gaining important insights and learning new skills parents can help their children reach their potential. The CAPS Community Education program provides parenting support as well as education to the community on how to keep children safe.

Payment

For more information:

Contact Us

Community Education utilizes three evidence-based / evidence-informed curriculums:

Triple P: Positive Parenting Program (Parent Support) Triple P is a parenting program, but it does not tell you how to be a parent. It is a toolbox of ideas. Parents choose the strategies they need and the way they want to use them. Classes include Group Triple P, Group Triple P in Spanish, Teen Group Triple P and Family Transitions.

Darkness to Light (Community Empowerment) Darkness to Light is an evidence-informed program which is focused on creating a world free of child abuse and neglect where adults have the courage to protect kids.

Monique Burr (Community Empowerment) The Monique Burr program educates and protects children and teens from all types of bullying, abuse, and victimization with evidence-based and evidence-informed prevention education programs. The program offers developmentally appropriate modules for all children in grades K-12.

GAL

Guardian ad Litem

What is GAL?

A Guardian ad Litem (GAL) is someone, assigned by the court, who collects objective and neutral information and makes recommendations to the court on behalf of a child who has experienced abuse or neglect. The GAL accomplishes this through in-home visits and talking to the child and others involved in the child’s life. The judge considers the recommendations made by the GAL and uses them, in addition to other sources, to make informed decisions that are in the best interest of the child. The GAL is not an attorney and does not provide legal advice.

At times, GAL services will extend to ensure that court orders are being followed and can assist in resolving disputes. The involvement of a GAL can help minimize the need for future court hearings by resolving issues outside of the courtroom.

It is important to remember that the GAL makes recommendations to the court; however, it is the judge who makes the decisions and issues the orders in each case.

Fees

Fees are charged for GAL services as ordered by the court. All fees are split evenly between the parties involved in the court case unless ordered differently by the court. Methods of payment accepted are cash, check, money order, and credit card (Visa and Mastercard). Any questions about fees can be directed to the accounting department at CAPS.

Payment

Common misconceptions of GAL services.

  • The GAL is provided by CAPS and assigned by the court and is not an attorney.

  • The GAL does not and cannot provide legal advice.

  • The GAL does not advocate on behalf of the parents, but on behalf of the child/ren’s best interest. The GAL is not a mental health professional and cannot provide counseling or therapeutic services.

  • The GAL is not trained or qualified to investigate allegations of child abuse or neglect. If a child is believed to be in imminent danger a report should be made to Child Protective Services by calling 1- 800-800-5556 or by contacting your local law enforcement agency.

For more information:

Contact Us

GAL

Guardian ad Litem

What is GAL?

A Guardian ad Litem (GAL) is someone, assigned by the court, who collects objective and neutral information and makes recommendations to the court on behalf of a child who has experienced abuse or neglect. The GAL accomplishes this through in-home visits and talking to the child and others involved in the child’s life. The judge considers the recommendations made by the GAL and uses them, in addition to other sources, to make informed decisions that are in the best interest of the child. The GAL is not an attorney and does not provide legal advice.

At times, GAL services will extend to ensure that court orders are being followed and can assist in resolving disputes. The involvement of a GAL can help minimize the need for future court hearings by resolving issues outside of the courtroom.

It is important to remember that the GAL makes recommendations to the court; however, it is the judge who makes the decisions and issues the orders in each case.

Fees

Fees are charged for GAL services as ordered by the court. All fees are split evenly between the parties involved in the court case unless ordered differently by the court. Methods of payment accepted are cash, check, money order, and credit card (Visa and Mastercard). Any questions about fees can be directed to the accounting department at CAPS.

Payment

Common misconceptions of GAL services.

  • The GAL is provided by CAPS and assigned by the court and is not an attorney.

  • The GAL does not and cannot provide legal advice.

  • The GAL does not advocate on behalf of the parents, but on behalf of the child/ren’s best interest. The GAL is not a mental health professional and cannot provide counseling or therapeutic services.

  • The GAL is not trained or qualified to investigate allegations of child abuse or neglect. If a child is believed to be in imminent danger a report should be made to Child Protective Services by calling 1- 800-800-5556 or by contacting your local law enforcement agency.

For more information:

Contact Us
Healthy Families

Healthy Families Rewards Program!

Rewards you for providing a healthy start for your child!

  • Families who participate in the CAPS Healthy Families program are eligible to receive free items to reward them for taking steps to provide a healthy start for their children.

  • Eligibility for the rewards program is based on completing home visits.

  • Free items include (but are not limited to) gas cards, diapers, baby proofing kits, infant supplies, breastfeeding supplies, and toys.

For more information:

Contact Us

Healthy Families

Building Healthy Families.

The CAPS Healthy Families program provides support and encouragement to parents to provide a healthy start for their children. By building confidence, reducing stress, and maximizing the joys of becoming a new mother or father, Healthy Families helps parents and children grow together.

Healthy Families is a voluntary home visitation program designed to promote healthy families and healthy children through a variety of services including child development, access to health care and parent education. Healthy Families is a program designed to help you strengthen your family and provide healthy growth and development for your children.

Why Healthy Families?

Parenting is the most difficult and important job anyone can have.  All parents need support and encouragement, and we believe that parents have the right to voice their own needs and determine what services and programs are best suited to help them.

By connecting parents with the most current information on how babies grow, change, and develop, we can help ensure they start on the right foot – and grow into a healthy childhood.

The CAPS Healthy Families program believes:

  • Parents are the best authority on determining their family’s needs.

  • All families have strengths which need to be recognized.

  • Every child should reach his or her potential.

  • Parents are responsible for their children.

  • Available services should begin early to support the needs of the family.

How can Healthy Families help?

Participants in Healthy Families receive regular visits beginning prenatally, or within 90 days after the birth of a baby and can continue to receive services until their child is 5 years old. A family support specialist (FSS) visits the family in their home to help establish support systems, teach problem-solving skills, and enhance positive parent-child interaction.

Services:

  • Initiate services prenatally or postnatal continuing up to the age of five.

  • Partner with families to support, enhance, and strengthen their wellbeing.

  • Help all families reach their highest potential.

  • Provide services tailored to individual needs and goals.

  • Offer trained family support worker in the home weekly, or as appropriate, to model, educate, and provide proven research-driven parenting information.

  • Connect families to appropriate community resources and service organizations based on their expressed needs and concerns.

  • Assist families to access appropriate health care.

Services are voluntary and provided at no charge to participants!

*Healthy Families Elkhart County™ is accredited by Healthy Families America®

Healthy Families

Building Healthy Families.

The CAPS Healthy Families program provides support and encouragement to parents to provide a healthy start for their children. By building confidence, reducing stress, and maximizing the joys of becoming a new mother or father, Healthy Families helps parents and children grow together.

Healthy Families is a voluntary home visitation program designed to promote healthy families and healthy children through a variety of services including child development, access to health care and parent education. Healthy Families is a program designed to help you strengthen your family and provide healthy growth and development for your children.

Why Healthy Families?

Parenting is the most difficult and important job anyone can have.  All parents need support and encouragement, and we believe that parents have the right to voice their own needs and determine what services and programs are best suited to help them.

By connecting parents with the most current information on how babies grow, change, and develop, we can help ensure they start on the right foot – and grow into a healthy childhood.

The CAPS Healthy Families program believes:

  • Parents are the best authority on determining their family’s needs.

  • All families have strengths which need to be recognized.

  • Every child should reach his or her potential.

  • Parents are responsible for their children.

  • Available services should begin early to support the needs of the family.

How can Healthy Families help?

Participants in Healthy Families receive regular visits beginning prenatally, or within 90 days after the birth of a baby and can continue to receive services until their child is 5 years old. A family support specialist (FSS) visits the family in their home to help establish support systems, teach problem-solving skills, and enhance positive parent-child interaction.

Services:

  • Initiate services prenatally or postnatal continuing up to the age of five.

  • Partner with families to support, enhance, and strengthen their wellbeing.

  • Help all families reach their highest potential.

  • Provide services tailored to individual needs and goals.

  • Offer trained family support worker in the home weekly, or as appropriate, to model, educate, and provide proven research-driven parenting information.

  • Connect families to appropriate community resources and service organizations based on their expressed needs and concerns.

  • Assist families to access appropriate health care.

Services are voluntary and provided at no charge to participants!

*Healthy Families Elkhart County™ is accredited by Healthy Families America®

Healthy Families

Healthy Families Rewards Program!

Rewards you for providing a healthy start for your child!

  • Families who participate in the CAPS Healthy Families program are eligible to receive free items to reward them for taking steps to provide a healthy start for their children.

  • Eligibility for the rewards program is based on completing home visits.

  • Free items include (but are not limited to) gas cards, diapers, baby proofing kits, infant supplies, breastfeeding supplies, and toys.

For more information:

Contact Us

Parent Aide

What is Parent Aide?

Parent Aide is a home visitation, family support service that helps families with children of all ages. Parent Aides are professionally trained individuals who become a role model to parents who need help in dealing with life’s daily challenges. Parent Aides teach parents to be more responsible and loving to their children. They provide support and encouragement, model appropriate parenting techniques, focus on the good qualities of the parents, and address special needs of the family by referring them to community agencies when necessary.

What can a Parent Aide do to help?

Parent Aides help parents learn to build their self-confidence, self-esteem and coping skills. Many parents benefit by understanding the developmental needs of their children, while learning how to manage their home environment more effectively. Parent Aides also teach parents how to make social contacts and to use community resources. CAPS Parent Aide program is the local provider for the Community Partners for Safe Families program.

Parent Aide is a program model of the National Exchange Club Foundation.

GAL

Who can be a part of Parent Aide?

The Parent Aide program is open to all parents with children under the age of 18, free of charge, who live in Elkhart County, who have an interest in learning more about parenting and would like a mentor to visit them in their home.

For more information:

Contact Us

Parent Aide

What is Parent Aide?

Parent Aide is a home visitation, family support service that helps families with children of all ages. Parent Aides are professionally trained individuals who become a role model to parents who need help in dealing with life’s daily challenges. Parent Aides teach parents to be more responsible and loving to their children. They provide support and encouragement, model appropriate parenting techniques, focus on the good qualities of the parents, and address special needs of the family by referring them to community agencies when necessary.

What can a Parent Aide do to help?

Parent Aides help parents learn to build their self-confidence, self-esteem and coping skills. Many parents benefit by understanding the developmental needs of their children, while learning how to manage their home environment more effectively. Parent Aides also teach parents how to make social contacts and to use community resources. CAPS Parent Aide program is the local provider for the Community Partners for Safe Families program.

Parent Aide is a program model of the National Exchange Club Foundation.

GAL

Who can be a part of Parent Aide?

The Parent Aide program is open to all parents with children under the age of 18, free of charge, who live in Elkhart County, who have an interest in learning more about parenting and would like a mentor to visit them in their home.

For more information:

Contact Us

Supervised Visits

What is Supervised Visitation?

Supervised visitation allows parents in high conflict or high risk situations access to their children in a safe and supervised environment. The noncustodial parent has access to the child only when supervised by another adult. Supervised visitation is used to protect children from potentially dangerous situations while allowing parental access and providing support for the parent child relationship.

What are the visits like?

Each family has a private space for visiting. The environment is safe and secure, with a security officer on duty. There are toys, play rooms, playground equipment, and a full kitchen available to our families. In addition, families are encouraged to bring in their favorite games, toys, and meals or snacks to share together during their visit.

What does the staff do during my visit?

Staff will document observations of the visit. This information will be sent to the referring caseworker or judge and attorneys involved. The facilitator may be in the room at all times or may leave periodically, depending on the level of supervision ordered by the court.

Payment

What does it cost?

For Department of Child Services clients, there is no fee. For parents referred through the superior courts there is a fee depending on the level of supervision that is ordered.

When are visits available?

CAPS offers supervised visitation at various days and times to accommodate work schedules. Most visits are one hour each week.

Contact Us

Supervised Visits

What is Supervised Visitation?

Supervised visitation allows parents in high conflict or high risk situations access to their children in a safe and supervised environment. The noncustodial parent has access to the child only when supervised by another adult. Supervised visitation is used to protect children from potentially dangerous situations while allowing parental access and providing support for the parent child relationship.

What are the visits like?

Each family has a private space for visiting. The environment is safe and secure, with a security officer on duty. There are toys, play rooms, playground equipment, and a full kitchen available to our families. In addition, families are encouraged to bring in their favorite games, toys, and meals or snacks to share together during their visit.

What does the staff do during my visit?

Staff will document observations of the visit. This information will be sent to the referring caseworker or judge and attorneys involved. The facilitator may be in the room at all times or may leave periodically, depending on the level of supervision ordered by the court.

Payment

What does it cost?

For Department of Child Services clients, there is no fee. For parents referred through the superior courts there is a fee depending on the level of supervision that is ordered.

When are visits available?

CAPS offers supervised visitation at various days and times to accommodate work schedules. Most visits are one hour each week.

Contact Us